Facing prosecution from state or federal authorities on alleged tax violations can be a daunting prospect. However, despite the risk of facing prosecution for tax crimes, in many cases, there are circumstances that may mitigate or refute the charges filed by authorities. Two California residents face such charges, as they were charged with tax crimes and other offenses that prosecutors say was part of a large scale mortgage fraud scheme.

Officials allege that the two individuals targeted Spanish speaking customers by offering them protection from their eviction in exchange for advance payments. It is alleged that the two stated that they were going to purchase the properties and then would offer their customers modified loans that were within the customers’ means to pay. However, prosecutors assert that they provided no such services.

It is also alleged that the defendants failed to file taxes for their business for a three year period. The two were arrested and booked on 41 criminal charges. They both remained in jail following their arrests.

Although it may be easy to jump to conclusions based merely on the allegations set forth by California prosecutors, securing a conviction on tax crimes can be a difficult task. As with all individuals accused of a crime in our state, these men enjoy a presumption of innocence that can only be removed if prosecutors are able to present enough evidence to convince a jury that there more than a reasonable doubt that the defendants committed the crimes alleged. Charges may be refuted if there is a lack of credible evidence, which could result in a not-guilty verdict.

Source: Mortgage News, “California AG Busts Two in $350,000 Mortgage Fraud Scheme,” Oct. 17, 2012